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Betting limits

Betting
limits

Understanding betting limits in poker will help you to choose the table that best matches your budget and style of play.

 

Tip

First-time player? You’re better off playing at a table where the limits are small.

Betting limits

Relates to games and tournaments

Raises

Relates to games and tournaments

Buying in

Relates to games only

Joining a table

Relates to games only

In order to make the following explanations easier to understand, all examples will be based on a $1/$2 poker table. Remember, the first number is the small limit and the second number is the big limit.

 

Texas Hold’em, Omaha and Omaha Hi/Lo

 

In no-limit poker

 

Blind Bet Amounts

The small blind bet is equal to the small limit: $1. The big blind bet is equal to the big limit: $2.

 

Amount of bets placed after the big blind bet

In all betting rounds, the minimum bet is equal to the big limit ($2 in our example). There is no maximum bet here since this is no-limit poker. Obviously, you can’t bet more than the total value of your stakes on the table.

Betting your entire stake is a game strategy called “All In.” You can bet your entire stake at any time in No-Limit Texas Hold’em. To bet it all, click on ALL IN.

 

In pot-limit poker

 

Pot-limit poker has the same rules as no-limit poker, except that the maximum bet is equal to the total value of the pot. If there is $20 in the pot, you can bet between $2 (the table minimum, equal to the big limit) and $20, the total value of the pot.

In pot-limit poker, you can obviously bet your entire stake if the value of the pot is equal to or greater than your stake. To bet it all, click on ALL IN.

 

In pot-limit poker

 

Blind Bet Amounts

The small blind bet is equal to half the small limit: 50 cents. The big blind bet is equal to the small limit: $1.

Amount of bets placed after the big blind bet

During the first and second betting rounds, the amount of the bet is equal to the small limit, $1. During the third and the fourth betting rounds, the amount of the bet is equal to the big limit, $2.

 

 

5-Card Stud and 7-Card Stud

 

In no-limit poker

 

The Ante

Before the game begins, all players have to place an Ante equal to half the small limit, 50 cents.

 

The Bring’in

Equal in value to the small limit, the Bring’in is placed by the player with the lowest card.

 

Bets placed after the Bring’in

During the first and second betting rounds, bets are equal to the small limit, $1. During subsequent betting rounds, bets are equal to the big limit, $2.

NOTE: If a player has a pair showing in his up cards in the second betting round, he can bet the big limit of the table ($2 in our example).

 

 

Five-Card Draw and 7-A Five-Card Draw

 

In pot-limit poker

 

Blind Bet

The small blind bet is equal to the small limit, $1. The big blind bet is equal to the big limit, $2.

 

Bets placed after the big blind bet

For each betting round, the minimum bet is equal to the big limit, $2 in our example. The maximum bet is equal to the total value of the pot.

In pot limit, you can obviously bet your entire stake if the value of the pot is equal to or greater than it. To bet it all, click on ALL IN.

 

In limit poker

 

Blind bet

The small blind bet is equal to half the small limit, 50 cents. The big blind bet is equal to the small limit, $1.

 

Bets placed after the big blind bet

During the first betting round, bets are equal to the small limit, $1. During the second betting round, bets are equal to the big limit, $2.

 

In all poker games

 

In no-limit and pot-limit poker

 

For all betting rounds in No-Limit and Pot Limit poker, there is no maximum number of raises.

- The amount of the first raise must be equal to or greater than twice the previous bet.

- Subsequent raises must be equal to or greater than the sum of the previous raise and the spread (difference) between the previous raise and the bet (or raise) that preceded it.

 

Exemple:
Player 1 – Bets $2
Player 2 – First raise ≥ $4.
Player 3 – Second raise ≥ $6 ($4 + ($4 - $2))

 

In this example, Player 2 can raise by $4 or more. If he chooses to raise by $9, Player 3 will need to raise by $16 or more ($9 + ($9 - $2)).

 

In limit poker

 

For all betting rounds in Limit Poker, a maximum of three raises is allowed.

In our table $1/$2 example, Player 1 bets $1 and Players 2, 3 and 4 can raise by adding $1 to the previous bet:

 

Player 1 – Bets $1
Player 2 – First raise = $2
Player 3 – Second raise = $3
Player 4 – Third and final raise = $4

 

The next player can call or fold, but cannot raise in the current betting round.

 

Heads-up

In Limit Poker Heads-Up situations – where there remain only two active players at the table – there is no maximum number of raises (in our example, the amount of the raise must always be $1 more than the previous bet).

 

The buy-in is the number of chips you need to join a Real Play table. There are rules on minimum and maximum buy-ins. These buy-in rules are general in nature and may vary in accordance with table limits.

 

In all poker games

 

When you sit down at a poker table, a message informing you of the minimum and maximum Buy In is automatically displayed on your screen. All you need to do is to enter the amount of your Buy In within the displayed limits. The buy-in cannot exceed your account’s spending limits.

 

In limit poker

 

The minimum amount of the buy-in is determined by the table’s small limit. On lotoquebec.com, this amount is set at 10 times the small limit (10 X $1, in our example). There is no maximum buy-in amount. In Limit Poker, you don’t need to bring large amounts to the table since the bets are limited.

 

In no-limit and pot-limit poker

 

The minimum Buy In is 20 times the big limit (20 X $2, in our example). The maximum Buy In is 100 times the big limit (100 X $2, in our example).

 

Buy-in and player stake

 

Your buy-in is your starting stake at the poker table. Your stake will fluctuate as you win and lose. During the game, if your stake drops below the minimum buy-in, you will have the option to rebuy chips (buy more chips) so that your stake is between the allowed table minimum and maximum. The amount of your rebuy is added to your stake for the next hand.

 

You can sit down at a Real Play table even after the game has started. Tournament play follows simple registration rules that are different from those that apply to Real Play games.

You have a variety of available options when you sit at a Real Play poker table where blind bets are required – Texas Hold’em, Omaha, Omaha Hi/Lo, Five-Card Draw and 7-A Five-Card Draw.

 

If you are not sitting at the big blind bet position, you can:

• Post (lay down a big blind bet) and start the game, or
• Wait to sit at the big blind bet position and lay down the big blind bet.

 

If you take a seat between the puck and one of the blind bet positions, you will need to wait until the puck is located at the position that follows yours. You will then have the same options as above. The same rules apply when you return to the table after an absence.

 

Sit out

 

All of our Practice or Real Play poker tables allow you to sit out, whereby you can stop playing for one or more games but keep your seat (this is not the same thing as the "Time out" feature that is explained in our section on responsible gaming). Gaming etiquette would have it that players take part in the game more than they refuse to do so. For example, it is considered unacceptable to sit out at a table in order to wait for a favourite opponent to arrive or to stop someone from playing head to head.

To do this, click on the "Sit out next hand" option. To return to the game, deselect this option. The MS and/or ML indicators will be displayed to show you the amounts of the blind bets you missed. You will need to pay in those amounts to return to the game.

 

MS means Missed Small – the Small blind bet you missed.
MB means Missed Big – the Big blind bet you missed.

 

Please note that if you take too long to choose your game option, the system will automatically make you check and then put you in "Sit out next hand" mode. If the "check" option is not available, the system will make you fold instead, before it puts you in the "Sit out next hand" mode. If you are absent for more than ten hands, you will be automatically booted from the table.